Celebrating a milestone: from left, Assistant County Manager Mike Callagy, County Manager John Maltbie, Supervisor Don Horsley, Fire Chief Ian Larkin and Dave Pine, President of the Board of Supervisors.

The new station has a two-story, 12,037-square-foot main building with individual quarters for 13 firefighters and a 1,638-square-foot vehicle building. Other highlights include:  

  • A drive-through apparatus building that frees engines from turning around and back-in vehicle storage building; 
  • A combined 628-square-foot conference/training room that can be used as community meeting space; 
  • Site improvements, including remediation of the sewage disposal system; 
  • A new driveway to Skyline Boulevard for improved access. 
Officials unveiled a new plaque on the front of the new Station 58. Measure K is a half-cent, voter-approved local sales tax for local needs.
Officials unveiled a new plaque on the front of the new Station 58. Measure K is a half-cent, voter-approved local sales tax for local needs.

In 2015, the Board of Supervisors allocated $4.074 million in Measure K (then known as Measure A) funding to build a new fire station. Voters passed the half-cent sales tax measure for essential services and critical facilities and Supervisor Don Horsley, whose Third District includes the fire station, said a new facility for the area was high on the priority list. Bonds covered the fire station’s remaining cost.

Board President Dave Pine told the crowd assembled at the ribbon cutting that Measure K has allowed the County to do “amazing things” but the ability to fund long-living capital projects like the fire station is “really special.” 

The County contracts with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) for service through Skylonda Fire Station No. 58 for Kings Mountain, La Honda, Upper Woodside and Skyline Boulevard. 

With the recent California wildfires fresh in everybody’s mind, several speakers used the ceremony as an opportunity to thank the assembled public safety staff.  

“You do important work each and every day. The people of this county and the people of this state thank you,” County Manager John Maltbie said. Horsley echoed the sentiment. 

“You really deserve a station like this,” Horsley said. 

Firefighters and construction crews at the ribbon cutting. The new station will have improved access to Skyline Boulevard, speeding up emergency response.
Firefighters and construction crews at the ribbon cutting. The new station will have improved access to Skyline Boulevard, speeding up emergency response.
When the new station is complete, crews will tear down the current Depression-era barracks, seen here. The new station is in the background.
When the new station is complete, crews will tear down the current Depression-era barracks, seen here. The new station is in the background.
The new station includes a large garage area for emergency vehicles. Engine 58, seen here, was purchased with funds from Measure K, the half-cent countywide sales tax. It replaced a 20-year-old engine.
The new station includes a large garage area for emergency vehicles. Engine 58, seen here, was purchased with funds from Measure K, the half-cent countywide sales tax. It replaced a 20-year-old engine.
An early construction photo shows how far workers have come in completing the new station.
An early construction photo shows how far workers have come in completing the new station.
County Manager John Maltbie addresses firefighters and members of the community gathered to celebrate the construction milestone.
County Manager John Maltbie addresses firefighters and members of the community gathered to celebrate the construction milestone.