Measure K Spotlight:

For Youth in Crisis, Help and Hope

The numbers are staggering: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that middle school students are as likely to die from suicide as traffic accidents. The number of girls 10 to 14 who died by suicide tripled nationwide from 1999 to 2014. Suicide has become a leading cause of death from preteens to young adults.

Here in San Mateo County, psychiatric emergency rooms complete more than 1,000 assessments a year of people under the age of 17 who are in crisis. The 2015 California Healthy Kids Survey found that a third of local high school students report chronic feelings of sadness or hopelessness in the past year, and about one in six seriously considered suicide. 

Suicide knows no boundaries and can affect any family regardless of income, background or culture. Preventing adolescent and teen suicide and self-harm is a national public health goal.

And it's a goal that a coalition of local leaders in schools, mental health, crisis intervention, law enforcement and government are taking on. Learn more.

Molly Henricks, a crisis services coordinator with San Mateo County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services, trains teachers, administrators, counselors and other school staff on ways to identify troubled students, intervene effectively and connect students with resources and services.
Molly Henricks, a crisis services coordinator with San Mateo County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services, trains teachers, administrators, counselors and other school staff on ways to identify troubled students, intervene effectively and connect students with resources and services.